Activities, Calls and Events

  • Policy Forum on YALE in SDG4 in Asia
    From Thursday 24 November 2016 – 08:00am
    To Friday 25 November 2016 – 05:00pmRethinking Education Session and GRALE launch / November 24, 2016
    Location Bangkok, Thailand
    Contact secretariat (@) icae.org.uy
  • Policy Forum on YALE – CS Consult
    From Thursday 24 November 2016 – 08:00am
    To Friday 25 November 2016 – 05:00pm
    DVV-ICAE-ASPBAE
    Location Bangkok, Thailand
    Contact: secretariat (@) icae.org.uy
  • AAACE Annual Conference
    From Tuesday 08 November 2016 – 08:00am
    To Friday 11 November 2016 – 05:00pm
    Location Albuquerque, NM – USA
    More Information
  • Decimotercera Conferencia Regional sobre la Mujer de América Latina y el Caribe
    From Tuesday 25 October 2016 – 08:00am
    To Friday 28 October 2016 – 05:00pm
    Más información
  • Lifelong Learning Week
    From Monday 10 October 2016 – 08:00am
    To Thursday 13 October 2016 – 05:00pm
    Rethinking Education Session – October 11, 2016
    Location Brussels, Belgium
    More information
  • ICAE/ Adult Education: “Failure and Prospects for Renewal in Arab World”Rethinking Education. Session and GRALE launch
    Location Amman, Jordan
    Contact: secretariat (@) icae.org.uy
  • 71st UN General AssemblyThe 71st Regular Session of the UN General Assembly (UNGA 71) will convene at UN Headquarters on Tuesday, 13 September 2016. The General Debate will open on Tuesday, 20 September 2016.
    More information
  • GEO Strategic Meeting
    From Thursday 08 September 2016 – 08:00am
    To Sunday 11 September 2016 – 05:00pmContact secretariat (at) icae.org.uy
    Location AWID Forum – Bahia, Brazil
    AWID FORUM
  • IALLA – Call for applications
    Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, from November 10 to 17, 2016.
    Please note that the working language will be French and the deadline to apply is September 5, 2016. Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at: icaeialla(@)gmail.com
  • Post-2015 intergovernmental negotiations (Follow-up and review)18 May 2015 – 22 May 2015
    New York
    ProgrammeDraft programme – Post-2015 intergovernmental negotiations (Follow-up and review)
    Background papers/Special studies
    Discussion Paper on Follow-up and Review of the Post-2015 Development Agenda
    Side events
    Preliminary Programme of Side Events (Post-2015, Follow-up and review)

Source: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/followupandreview

  • EAEA & dvv international workshop: “Adult education and the post-2015 process”
    Time: 30.01.2015 – 30.01.2015
    Location: Brussels, BelgiumEAEA and DVV International invite you to a workshop on adult education and development on 30 January 2015. At the meeting, we will discuss non-formal and informal adult education in the context of the post-2015 agenda. Lifelong learning is a key for achieving social change and reducing poverty levels around the world and needs to be recognised not only as a goal, but also as a means of development.A presentation by Prof. Timothy Ireland (University of Paraíba, Brazil) on ‘Development and Education in the post-2015 Agenda’ will serve as a basis for discussion. Together with colleagues from CONCORD Europe, we will take a closer look at the European Year for Development 2015 and the activities of civil society. With DG DEVCO, European Commission, we will discuss the EU strategies on adult education and development in the post-2015 process.Please find the preliminary agenda of our workshop hereThe workshop will serve as a platform for exchange of experience and expertise in order to create a strategy plan for adult education and development in the post-2015 agenda.Please register by 26 January 2015 by sending an e-mail to Raffaela Kihrer (EAEA)

 

  •  Call for civil society responses to the UN Secretary-General’s Synthesis Report on the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Dear Colleagues,

On 4 December, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon informally presented an advance, unedited version of his synthesis report on the post-2015 development agenda to UN Member States. “The Road to Dignity by 2030: Ending Poverty, Transforming All Lives and Protecting the Planet” outlines a vision for Member States to consider carrying forward in negotiations leading up to the UN Special Summit on Sustainable Development in September 2015 that will adopt the post-2015 development agenda.

The advanced unedited version of the report is available here: http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/
Read the Secretary-General’s statement about the report here: http://www.un.org/sg/statements/
Watch a video of the Secretary-General’s briefing about the report here

Source UN NGLS

 

 

  • Sixth session of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development GoalsMeans of implementation (science and technology, knowledge-sharing and capacity building); Global partnership for achieving sustainable development Needs of countries in special situations, African countries, LDCs, LLDCs, and SIDS as well as specific challenges facing the middle-income countries Human rights, the right to development, global governanceSide Events
    Please click here for the Preliminary Programme of Side Events.

 

  • Interactive Multistakeholder Dialogue: Second meeting of the Intergovernmental committee of experts on sustainable development financing

    The Intergovernmental Committee of Experts on Sustainable Development Financing (ICESDF) will hold its Second Session from 2-6 December 2013 at UN Headquarters (New York) in the Trusteeship Council Chamber.

    While this will be a closed session, reserved to the Committee, an interactive multistakeholder dialogue will be organized on Thursday 5 December, 2013, from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and will be open to all.

    This interactive dialogue will be divided into two parts:

    – a briefing from the Co-chairs on the work of the Committee, followed by questions and answers from the floor from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.;

    – presentations from a panel composed of four representatives from NGOs, business and industry sectors and other Major Groups engaged in the Rio+20 Conference and the Financing for Development process, followed by an open discussion with the audience, from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

    Please register here.

 

  • REUNIÓN REGIONAL DE CONSULTA DE GRUPOS PRINCIPALES Y ACTORES RELEVANTES DE AMÉRICA LATINA Y EL CARIBE 2013
    18 y 19 de noviembre en la Ciudad de Panamá, Panamá
    Para obtener más información http://www.unep.org/civil-society
    http://www.pnuma.org/
  • SUBJECT: The Global Thematic Consultation on Education in the Post-2015 Development Agenda

    The draft Executive Summary of the Global Consultation on Education is open for public online commenting through 27th May.

    You can participate and leave your comments following these easy steps:

    1. Read the draft Executive Summary – it is posted online;

    2. In the Post a Reply box start by typing in your name, age, gender, country, organization; Continue typing in your comments:

    3. Be brief and precise; comment in not more than 300 words referring to the draft executive summary.

     Who can participate?

    You are welcome to invite individuals and organizations to take part. Views and comments can be posted in English or in any of the 60 languages that the Google translator supports on the web space.

    Your inputs will help finalize the Executive Summary and the Synthesis Report of the Global Thematic Consultation on Education which will then feed into the inter-governmental debate on the post-2015 development agenda at the 2013 UN General Assembly in September.

    Comment online now and spread the word  -> click here http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/349169

    CONTACT: Mamura Nasirova
    Online Facilitator
    Email: mnasirova@unicef.org
    Website: www.worldwewant2015.org/education2015

    http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/all-events/?tx_browser_pi1[showUid]=14565&cHash=6d5288185d

  • Transmisión en vivo vía Internet
    Panel 1 (Plenario)
    La Universalidad de la Agenda de Desarrollo Post-2015. Identificando los Componentes Transversales.
    Jueves 18 de abril de 2013
    15:30 hrs. UTC -05:00
    Hotel Hilton
    Guadalajara, Jalisco, México
    “Realizing the Future We Want for All”
    http://xs-polycom.cloudapp.net/sre2/

Más información: http://participacionsocial.sre.gob.mx/post2015.php

  • Disability and Development – Online Consultation begins 8-28 MarchAs part of the preparatory process for the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development, an online consultation will be held here starting next Friday, 8 March and will run for three weeks until 28 March.In many countries gains made on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have not been successful in reaching marginalized populations, including persons with disabilities.  This clearly highlights the importance of taking inequality, discrimination and social exclusion more effectively into account both in the still ongoing efforts to accelerate and expand progress on the MDGs and in the definition of the new development framework that will succeed the MDGs post-2015.On 23 September 2013 the UN General Assembly will hold a High-level Meeting on disability and development, with the overarching theme “The way forward: a disability inclusive development agenda towards 2015 and beyond”, at UN Headquarters in New York.To ensure that the post-2015 agenda is inclusive of disabilities, the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs in collaboration with UNICEF is holding an online, moderated consultation to gather views from a broad range of stakeholders on how to include disability in the post-2015 development framework, in order to inform the High-level Meeting.To participate, you are invited to register to the consultation here. Simultaneous consultations will take place in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.  The site is compatible with screen readers, however, if you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: inequalities@worldwewant2015.org.  Please note that the forum is moderated, therefore your post will not appear immediately but will be posted within twenty-four hours.The recommendations emerging from your contributions will be incorporated into a report on the consultations to inform the outcome document for the UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD), in New York on 23 September 2013.The consultation aims to be as broad and open as possible, in order to enable a multitude of voices to be heard from academia, media, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), civil society, private sector, governments and the UN System. Please invite your colleagues, partners and networks to participate.

    Discussions begin here on Friday, 8 March 2013!

  • CSOs Forum and Outreach Session of the HLPEP Bali 23th to 25th March 2013

    Spanish – French – Indonesia

     

    (Applications are now  available)

    Applications are now open to national, regional, and global CSOs who want to participate in the upcoming CSOs Outreach during the Fourth UN High Level Panel Meeting on Post-2015 to be held in Bali, Indonesia

    The fourth meeting of the High Level Panel will take place from March 25th to 27th  2013 under the theme of: “Global Partnership”. The first day of the HLP meeting will be an outreach and consultation day, where the Panel of Eminent Persons will take stock of key constituencies’ emerging positions and new evidence, including global CSOs.

    The CSOs outreach day will be an one day town hall meeting involving 150 CSOs representatives and members of the HLP, to be held on March 25th  2013. This meeting will be preceded by a CSOs Pre-Consultative Forum on March 24th  2013,  with 150 participants (50 International and 100 Indonesian). CSOs participants will have an opportunity to meet among themselves in order to prepare for the engagement with HLP members and agree on strategic positions.  CSOs will also use this platform to review outcomes of various CSOs engagements that have taken place.

    Consultations with CSOs will be jointly organized by the Indonesian CSOs post-2015 Coalitions,  the Asia-wide CSOs Working Group  and other regional CSOs focal points from Africa Latin America, North America and Europe,  MENA and Pacific to ensure diverse participation in the CSOs outreach events.

    Interested organizations/networks/social movements should fill in this application form , and submit it  to bali@infid.or.id

    A final list of participants will be announced by February 28th  2013.  Invitation Letters will be sent  to selected participants after the announcement.

    For more information, please refer to  Bali Call for Applications. Inquiries to the Indonesian CSOs Coalition for post-2015 can be directed to  bali@infid.or.id

    Source

  • Advancing the Post-2015 Sustainable Development AgendaReconfirming Rights – Recognising Limits – Redefining Goals20-22 March 2013 in Bonn, GermanyWe have the pleasure of announcing the international NGO conference ADVANCING THE POST-2015 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AGENDA Reconfirming Rights – Recognising Limits – Redefining Goals. This global event will bring together about 250 civil society activists and representatives from key stakeholders in order to draw together civil society inputs into the Sustainable Development and Post-2015 discussions. It will take place on 20 – 22 March 2013 in Bonn, Germany. Funding for a limited number of participants, mainly from developing countries, is available.Read more
  • AWID / La Agenda De Desarrollo Post-2015 De La ONU – Un Análisis Crítico

    The UN Post-2015 Development Agenda – A Critical Analysis
  • UNICEF, UN Women Launch Newsletter on Inequalities ConsultationJanuary 2013: The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and UN Women, the co-leaders of the Post-2015 Global Thematic Consultation on Inequalities, have released an online newsletter on the Consultation. The newsletter features the release of the Draft Report on Global Thematic Consultation on Inequalities, which is now available for comments, and online discussions taking place in January and February 2013.More
  • Third HLP meet in Monrovia to focus on “National Building Blocks for Sustained Prosperity”ICAE members Odile Faye of AAWARD and Nebila Abdulmelik of FEMNET will be participating and attending CSO events on 28th and 29th January; and will then meet with the High Level Panel members on 30th January during the CSO Outreach day.With a view to this meeting, a consultation was held among civil society organizations by the end of December/beginning of January and ICAE participated in this consultation so you can have access to the replies submitted by ICAE through this link:  http://www.icae2.org/?q=en/node/1687Following the meetings held in New York and London, the High-level Panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda will convene again in Monrovia, Liberia for substantive interactions hosted by HLP Co-Chair, President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf. The meeting will be held between 30 Jan to 1 Feb 2013 and will include a dialogue with civil society and other stakeholders.Discussions will be organized around the broad theme of “National Building Blocks for Sustained Prosperity,” with a particular focus on economic transformation.Topics under discussion include (i) Enablers and barriers to economic transformation (ii) Equitable and sustainable outcomes (iii) Role of the Private Sector (iv) Governance and Institution building, with a particular focus on conflict affected and fragile States. An emphasis on African Perspectives and Positions is also proposed.More information will be shared shortly.
    Please track www.askafricanow.org and www.worldwewant2015.org/post2015hlp for further updates.
  • Invitación al debate electrónico sobre empleo y medios de vida
    More
  • Business leaders at the World Economic Forum must boost finance for educationPosted on 18 January 2013 by Pauline Rose
    As political and business leaders gather in Davos for another year’s World Economic Forum, the Education for All Global Monitoring Report has released a new policy paper  showing that contributions from corporations and private foundations combined total only $683 million a year, equivalent to just 5% that aid donors spend on education. And while aid donors are increasingly backing government-led education plans, private sector contributions often reflect business interests rather than the education needs of the poorest countries.
    More
  • Join the online Discussion on Young People & InequalitiesWelcome to this discussion on Young People and Inequalities in the post-2015 development agenda. The discussion is co-moderated by UNICEF, Restless Development, World Vision International and UN Volunteers.The discussion aims to gather views from a broad range of stakeholders on issues related to Young People and inequalities as they affect the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Your recommendations will inform the UN’s work on the Post-2015 framework and feed into the work of the High-Level Panel on the Post-215 Development Agenda and related processes.The discussion begann on 17 December and runs until 18 January 2012. Make your voice heard!More
  • Join the Global Thematic Consultation on EducationWelcome Note from the Co-ConvenorsUNESCO and UNICEF are very pleased to announce the launch of the Global Consultation on Education and invite you to participate. This is one of a series of country and global thematic consultations that the United Nations Development Group (UNDG) is convening with the aim to ensure a diversity of voices in conversations on the shape and content of the Post-2015 Development Agenda.  One of the themes that has been identified as a matter of critical importance is education.The Global Consultation on Education is an inclusive, participatory and democratic process for young people, civil society, non-governmental organizations, governments, academia, media, the UN system and the private sector entities from around the world to contribute their experiences and ideas on how to improve education around the world. The consultation will help review progress on the Education for All (EFA) goals and the MDGs and discuss how to ensure that the issues around education are effectively addressed and have a central place in a new development framework after 2015.Running from now until March 2013, and leveraging technology and social media tools to engage participants in online, moderated e-discussions, the Education Consultation will embrace four specific areas: 1.  Equitable Access to Education;  2. Quality of Learning;  3. Global Citizenship, Skills and Jobs; 4. Governance and Financing of Education. Each of the four e-discussions will last approximately two weeks. The first discussion on Equitable Access to Education runs from 10 December to 24 December.This is a unique opportunity for you to participate and contribute with your recommendations and suggestions. On the public, open-access discussion forum you are welcome to talk about education-related issues that you think should be a priority in the next development agenda.   We encourage you to post your ideas and thoughts as an individual or a group and share the voices of the persons, organizations or communities you represent as well as to invite individuals and organizations to take part in this conversation. Views and comments can be posted in any of the 60 languages that the Google translator supports on the web space.The results of e-discussions will be presented in a synthesis report form at the Education Leadership Meeting in Dakar, Senegal in February 2013. A final summary report will then feed into the High Level Panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda (HLP), as well as to the inter-governmental debate on the post-2015 development agenda at the 2013 UN General Assembly.Join the Consultation today at http://www.worldwewant2015.org/education2015. Voice your opinion in the e-discussions and shape the future of education! Spread the word using #Education2015 and follow us on Twitter; review and comment on education resources on the web space; post and share your or your organization’s work related to education; blog and comment on other participants’ contributions.We are looking forward to your participation in this important and exciting conversation.With best regards,Olav Seim, Director, Education for All (EFA) Global Partnerships Team, UNESCOJordan Naidoo, Senior Education Advisor, UNICEFCo-Convenors of the Post-2015 Global Thematic Consultation on EducationFor more info, please contact: education@worldwewant2015.org
  • Join the online Discussion on Indigenous Peoples & Inequalitieshttps://i0.wp.com/farm9.staticflickr.com/8487/8162004060_711fd88366_m.jpgDear colleague,Indigenous people were absent from the Millennium Declaration and have remained so throughout the Millennium Development Goals processes: according to the UN System Task Team report on the post-2015 agenda, the MDGs have not reached the poorest and most marginalized people. To ensure that inequalities are addressed in the post-2015 agenda, the Global Thematic Consultation on Addressing Inequalities (co-led by UNICEF and UN Women) is holding a series of online, moderated discussions to gather views from a broad range of stakeholders on what the post-2015 development agenda should look like.In this context, we would like to invite you to join an online discussion on inequalities and indigenous peoples, co-moderated by the Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (SPFII) and experts from Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations.The discussion is taking place from 27 November to 14 December.To participate, please post your response in the discussion forum at http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/284745. You are invited to register to the consultation here. The site is available in English, French and Spanish. You are invited to post your comments in any of the sixty languages supported by Google Translate.  If you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: inequalities@worldwewant2015.org.The discussion is co-moderated by Myrna Cunningham Kain, Member of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and Nilla Bernardi, Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (SPFII). They will be joined by experts from Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations beginning with:
    •    Roberto Borrero, Chair, NGO Committee on the UN International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples
    •    Jennifer Koinante, Director, SIIWA, Kenya
    To kick off the global conversation, we invite you to reflect on the following questions, among others:1. What are the most important forms of inequalities faced by indigenous peoples? – including discussion of where and among whom these challenges occur, their severity, the evidence about them, etc.2. What are the major structural factors at the root of these inequalities, within and among different societies?3. What kinds of policies, strategies or interventions have been most successful in addressing the various inequalities experienced by indigenous peoples? And under which conditions/in which situations have particular policies, strategies or interventions had the greatest, lasting impact? (Contributors may wish to cite examples or give references to these “successes”).4. Based on experience, what are the most important recommendations that could be proposed in the Post-2015 Development Agenda for making a lasting and transformative impact on the different forms of inequalities faced by indigenous peoples?5. What actions and initiatives could be taken by different stakeholders, including civil society and indigenous peoples organizations, to bring about lasting improvements in these inequalities? And how should those who face inequalities themselves be enabled to participate in the implementation phase of the new Development Framework?The recommendations emerging from your contributions will be incorporated into a report on ‘Addressing Inequalities in the Post-2015 Development Agenda’, to be presented at a high-level meeting in February 2013 in Copenhagen. The report will also be transmitted to the High-level Panel on Post-2015, appointed by the UN Secretary-General.The consultation aims to be as broad and open as possible, in order to enable a multitude of voices to be heard from academia, media, indigenous peoples’ organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), civil society, private sector, governments and the UN System.  We look forward to hearing from you on how to realize the Future We Want for All.Warm regards,Bethany Donithorn
    Post-2015 Global Thematic Consultation on Addressing Inequalities
    United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
    3 United Nations Plaza, NY, NY 10017Contact: inequalities@worldwewant2015.org
    Discussion website: www.worldwewant2015.org/node/284745
  • Join the consultation on Teaching and Learning for DevelopmentPosted on 26 November 2012 by Kate RedmanA learning crisis is leaving one in three primary school-aged children not achieving  basic skills, whether they are in school or not. This revelation makes the theme of the 2013 Education for All Global Monitoring Report (GMR) on Teaching and Learning for Development more timely than ever. World leaders ignore the learning crisis at their peril. It is not only failing children, but also leaving countries without the knowledge and skills needed to accelerate progress towards tackling poverty reduction, malnutrition, environmental degradation, and other development outcomes.More: EFA
  • INVITATION: Online Discussion on Economic Inequalities in the Post-2015 Development AgendaDear colleague,As the 2015 target date for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) approaches, there are a growing number of processes on what a post-2015 development agenda will look like. Key components of these processes are the Global Thematic Consultations on the post-2015 development agenda, co-convened by civil society and the United Nations.Economic inequalities within countries have increased significantly since 1990 with income and consumption gaps between the rich and poor, widening even in countries that have experienced fast economic growth. Overall, the extreme inequality in the distribution of the world’s income should make us question the current development model.In this context, and as part of the post-2015 process, we would like to invite you to an online discussion on economic inequality; a collaborative effort between the Global Thematic Consultation on Addressing Inequalities (co-lead by UNICEF and UN Women), Save the Children, ILO and UN-DESA.This discussion is taking place from 19 November to 14 December 2012.To participate, please visit the site http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/286845 and post your response in the discussion forum. You are also invited to register to the consultation. The site is available in English, French and Spanish. You are also invited to post your comments in any of the sixty languages supported by Google translate.The discussion is co-moderated by Alex Cobham, Save the Children, Janine Berg, ILO, Marta Roig, UN-DESA and Martin C Evans, UNICEF.The consultation aims to be as broad and open as possible, in order to enable a multitude of voices to be heard from academia, media, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), civil society, private sector, governments and the UN System. We invite you to join us in envisioning a world where freedom from violence and discrimination enables people, wherever they live, to contribute their full potential to the development of their societies.The recommendations emerging from your contributions will be incorporated into a report on ‘Addressing Inequalities in the Post-2015 Development Agenda’, to be presented at a high-level meeting in February 2013 in Copenhagen. The report will also be transmitted to the High-level Panel on Post-2015 appointed by the UN Secretary-General.The online discussion will be framed into three main themes, but to kick off the conversation on economic inequality we invite you to reflect on the following questions, among others:Causes of and Trends in Economic Inequality:
    1.    What are the major structural factors at the root of growing economic inequalities within societies?   Do these differ for inequalities of income, consumption and wealth?
    2.    Do the main causes of persistent economic inequalities differ between countries or regions of the world?
    3.    How has economic inequality changed over the past decades in different types of societies and regions of the world?
    A second phase of the discussion will look at ‘Measurement and Assessment of Economic Inequality’, where we will be seeking ways to better capture their causes, severity and effects. The third and last phase of the discussion will seek recommendations for ‘Policy Responses to Economic Inequality’.We look forward to hearing from you on how to realize the Future We Want for All.Warm regards,Bethany Donithorn
    Post-2015 Global Thematic Consultation on Addressing Inequalities
    United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
    3 United Nations Plaza, NY, NY 10017Contact: inequalities@worldwewant2015.org
    Discussion website: www.worldwewant2015.org/node/286845
  • Invitation to Join the Addressing Inequalities ConsultationWhat is the Addressing Inequalities Consultation?Aiming to ensure a broad span and diversity of voices in conversations on the shape and content of the Post-2015 Development Agenda, the United Nations Development Group (UNDG) is convening a series of country and global thematic consultations.  There will be 50-100 national consultations and eleven global thematic consultations on topics which have been identified as being of critical importance to the discussions on the “world we want”, both now and beyond 2015.As the co-convenors of the global thematic consultation on Addressing Inequalities, UN Women and UNICEF are very pleased to invite you to join this global consultation, sponsored by the Governments of Denmark and Ghana.  The aim of the consultation is to review progress on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in terms of major inequalities and to discuss the options for ensuring that these inequalities are effectively addressed in a new development framework after 2015.In support of an open, participatory process for the formulation of the post-2015 development era, this consultation aims to enable the participation of civil society, academia, governments, the UN system, the media, national and international non-governmental organizations and the private sector in the discussions on how the next development framework can most effectively incorporate and address key issues of inequality and the factors underlying them.Activities are starting now, and will continue over the next several months, leveraging technology and social media to engage participants in the form of online, moderated discussions on specific issues related to inequalities.How can I participate?The Addressing Inequalities Consultation space – is hosted by the www.worldwewant2015.org site, co-owned by the UN System and Civil Society.  Within this space, we are hosting a series of online, moderated discussions on major, globally-prevalent forms of inequality related to gender, disability, indigenous and minority group status, sexual orientation, etc.  New discussions will be launched on the site approximately every two weeks, led by expert moderators from the UN system and Civil Society.  Each discussion will be time-bound, lasing approximately three weeks, to allow time for detailed discussion of issues from as broad a range of participants as possible.  The full calendar of upcoming discussions is available on the site.  Visitors to the site are also able to pose questions to key development actors via live-streamed discussions on inequalities and occasional “Twitter chats”.The data collected from this online engagement on Inequalities, including summaries of the discussions and inputs from civil society organizations submitted via the site, will be synthesized in the form of a final report and recommendations to be presented at a Leadership Meeting in Copenhagen in February 2013, where key decision-makers will be presented with the outcomes of the consultation process.This is a public, open-access discussion forum and contributions are welcomed from all those with a stake in the next development agenda.  This is an opportunity to influence the agenda, and you are encouraged to share the voices of the people or communities you represent, particularly those who are not able to access the consultations online.  The first discussion kicks off on Wednesday, 3 October, on the theme of Gender Equality, co-moderated by UN Women, and we welcome your participation.To participate, visit the website at: www.worldwewant2015.org/inequalities and post your response to the discussion questions in the discussion forum.  You do not need to register in order to post comments, but you are welcomed and encouraged to do so.  The website is available in English, French and Spanish, and you may post contributions in any of the sixty languages supported by the site’s Google translate feature.More
  • Born Equal: Inequality, education and post-2015
    Posted on 14 November 2012 by EFA reportA guest post from Alex Cobham, Head of Research at Save the Children UK.Children suffer twice the inequality of income as the general population, and this has grown by a third since the 1990s. As the UN High Level Panel on the post-2015  international development framework met in London earlier this month, Save the Children’s new report, Born Equal, presented this new evidence and called for inequality to be at the centre of the new framework.Born Equal alsoincludes a synthesis of eight country case studies (Brazil, Canada, China, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Nigeria and the UK) focusing on horizontal (group) inequality, which draws out some important dimensions of inequality – not least, in terms of education.I’ve written on Uncounted about the reasons why inequality  is so important for post-2015, and for Save the Children, but will summarise briefly here. First and foremost, it is because inequality undermines children’s well-being, with permanent effects across their entire lifespan. In addition, we know that inequality is an obstacle to development in general – reducing economic growth and fuelling conflict. Finally, of course, inequality has grown sharply – in seven out of our eight case study countries, for example – and so has become the major obstacle to international development. Without challenging these deeply damaging trends in the post-2015 framework, there is little hope of making the scale of development progress that we are aiming for.Education for children is an especially important area of inequalities. In summarising the literature, we highlight in particular the findings on the impact of inequality on children’s development. The evidence from the major Young Lives study is that progress is “highly dependent” on perceptions of relative social status, and of personal and economic opportunities. Previous work such as that of Hoff and Pandey has shown immediate impacts of social divisions – in this case, with the visibility of caste exhibiting a major influence on children’s performance in tests.The Young Lives studies, because of their longitudinal nature, have been able to trace additional and long-term paths of inequality. Perhaps most powerfully, the results show that nutrition not only has significant effects on intellectual capacity, but also major psychosocial effects (on self-esteem and educational aspirations). The systematic way in which the same groups (notably rural children, children from ethnolinguistic minorities and children from less educated mothers – see e.g. the graph here from the Vietnam study) are marginalised in different study countries and in different dimensions of development compounds the effects of inequality in any one.The eight country case studies conducted for Born Equal provide a great deal of evidence on education, and indeed inequalities here (and the policy responses to them) emerged as a consistent theme. We saw consistently higher dropout rates in India for children from scheduled castes and – above all – from scheduled tribes. We set out new regression results on the relative importance of income, race, gender, rural-urban and regional location differences for the chances of children being delayed in school in Brazil.More positively, we found evidence on the power of policy to respond – starting with universal provision but going beyond, aiming to ‘correct’ for underlying inequalities and marginalisation (for example, in Canada and Brazil). In addition, we identify a range of broader policy areas – including in labour markets, and through progressive taxation and transfers – through which inequality can, and should be targeted.Aside from domestic policy implications, what does this mean for the post-2015 framework itself? In Born Equal, we make the recommendation that to address inequalities in outcomes (and to improve children’s economic opportunities) the post-2015 framework should include a target on reducing income inequality and other disparities in wealth within countries, under the broader goal of poverty eradication. The target and indicator could utilise the gap between the richest and poorest quintiles (the 20:20 gap) or, following recent research, the 10:40 gap between the top decile and the bottom two quintiles. Similar targets that aim to reduce the gap between the best-off and worst-off groups can be proposed in each major dimension of inequality, and for each area that the post-2015 framework covers (eg, mortality rates as well as income).As I argued at UNESCO just before we released the report, there is an opportunity for the education sector to play a major leading role, in putting inequality at the core of post-2015. A combination of three factors support leadership from education, in setting inequality at the hear of post-2015:the (relatively!) strong availability of disaggregated data;
    the opportunity for political consensus (because of the social costs of inequality undermining individuals’ access to education, so that injustice and instrumental arguments align); and
    the fact of education having provided, through the original Education for All goals, the most direct and powerful inequality challenge in the Millennium Development Goals: the gender equality target (which is the exact forerunner of the broader inequality targets that Save the Children has proposed).There’s a full post on Uncounted setting out this argument in detail, and I’m very keen to hear from education sector specialists on this. As Born Equal illustrates, Save the Children believes that inequality must be fundamentally tackled in the post-2015 framework, if the necessary scale of progress is to be possible. It would be immensely valuable to hear that argument being made strongly from the education sector.–Download our latest report: http://bit.ly/SZEdX2

Source: World Education Blog

  • High-level Panel of Eminent Persons on the post-2015 development agendaDear Colleagues,The High-level Panel of Eminent Persons on the post-2015 development agenda will hold its first substantive meeting in London from 31 October to 2 November 2012, and will focus on the issue of household poverty.As part of the Panel’s efforts to reach out to civil society and other stakeholders, a global online consultation will be held from 19-26 October around the same framing questions the Panel will address, namely on:1. Human development; and:
    2. Jobs and livelihoods.Interested organizations and networks are invited to participate in the consultation here . Participants are strongly encouraged to send their contributions well in advance of the 26 October deadline. Substantive contributions will be complied and synthesised by the UN Non-Governmental Liaison Service (UN-NGLS) and inform the Panel discussions in London.This process is expected to be repeated for the subsequent Panel meetings, where more lead-time will be given for groups to be able to develop submissions.Subsequent High-level Panel meetings (dates to be confirmed) will be held in Monrovia (Liberia) and Bali (Indonesia) on the following topics:•        Monrovia: national development
    •        Bali: global partnershipsPlease feel free to share this information with your networks.Best regards,UN-NGLS
    @unngls
  • Invitation: Discussion on Gender-Based Violence in the post-2015 development agendaDear colleague,
    As the 2015 target date for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) approaches, there are a growing number of processes on what a post-2015 development agenda will look like. Key components of these processes are the Global Thematic Consultations on the post-2015 development agenda.  Co-convened by civil society and the United Nations, these consultations aim to capture the voices of citizens around the world and form strategic coalitions of partners that can help shape the post-2015 development agenda.As part of this process, we would like to invite you to an online discussion on Gender-Based Violence; a collaborative effort between the Global Thematic Consultation on Addressing Inequalities (co-lead! by UNICEF and UN Women) and the Global Thematic Consultation on the Impact of Conflict, Violence and Disaster in the Post-2015 Development Agenda (co-lead by UNDP, PBSO, UNICEF and ISDR).  This discussion will take place from 17 October onwards.To participate, please visit the site: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/280134 and post your ! response in the discussion forum.  The discussion will be co-moderated by Dr. Roma Bhattacharjea, Senior Gender Advisor and Team Leader, BCPR/UNDP and Tania Farha, Programme Specialist, UN Women.  Throughout the discussion they will be joined by guest moderators representing civil society, who will assist in responding to your questions and contributions, and guiding and summarizing the discussion. We are delighted to introduce the first of these guest moderators:

    • Marai Larasi, Executive Director, Imkaan, UK
    • Ivy Josiah, Executive Director, Women’s Aid Organization, Malaysia & Board of Directors, IWRAW Asia Pacific
    • Patricia Guerrero, Director, Ligade of Displaced Women, Colombia
    • Mandana Hendessi, Manager, International Alert, UK

    The consultation aims to be as broad and open as possible, in order to enable a multitude of voices to be heard from academia, media, national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the private sector, governments, the UN System, and most importantly, civil society. You are strongly encouraged to share not only your views, but also engage with and bring forth the voices of the constituencies you represent, and who may not be able to participate online.  We invite you to join us in envisioning a world where the security of all members of soci! ety is ensured and freedom from violence enables women, men, boys and girls to contribute their full potential to the development of their societies.

    The recommendations emerging from your contributions will be incorporated into reports on ‘Addressing Inequalities’ and the ‘Impact of Violence, Conflict and Disaster on the Post-2015 development agenda’, to be presented at high-level meetings in February 2013.  Both reports will also be transmitted to the High-level Panel appointed by the Secretary-General.

    Discussion Questions:

    To kick off the global conversation on Gender-Based Violence we invite you to reflect on the following set of questions:

    1. What are the major structural factors at the root of Gender-Based Violence (GBV), within and among different societies?
    2. What are the challenges or the obstacles to addressing the structural factors/causes of GBV? What are someeffective strategies/approaches to overcoming these challenges/obstacles?
    3. What forms of violence are not adequately addressed through State responses?
    4. What are the challenges for developing inclusive policies and strategies to address the issue of GBV for women who suffer multiple forms of discrimination (e.g. women with disabilities, HIV/AIDs, indigenous women, sexworkers, LGBTI women etc…)?
    5. How has GBV been integrated into wider gender equality policies, budgets and advocacy approaches? For example how has GBV been integrated into wider approaches to citizen security (e.g. in Latin America, in the context of widespread urban violence, etc.) or within other sectors (e.g. education, labour, health)?

    Further questions will be posed as the discussion continues.

    Please post your response in the discussion forum at: www.worldwewant2015.org/node/280134

    You are also invited to register to the consultation here.

    The site is available in English, French and Spanish. In addition, you are invited to post your contribution in any of the sixty languages supported by the site’s Google translate feature.

    Without further ado, the space is yours. We look forward to hearing from you on how to realize the Future We Want for All.

    Warm regards,

    Samuel Doe;
    Policy Advisor & Team Leader, Policy & Planning Division; UNDP
    Co-Convenor of the Post-2015 Global Thematic Consultation on Conflict, Violence and Disaster

    Saraswathi Menon; Director of Policy Division; UN Women

    Richard Morgan;Senior Advisor, Post-2015 Development Agenda; UNICEF

    Co-Convenors of the Post-2015 Global Thematic Consultation on Addressing Inequalities

    Contact: inequalities@worldwewant2015.org

     

  • Protecting quality public education in a time of crisis (18 October 2012)Español Français

    Education unions from across the globe meet for the ‘Education in Crisis’ Seminar on 18-19 October in Brussels.
    Education throughout the world is in a state of crisis. The economic recession has prompted governments to implement drastic austerity measures, with negative repercussions for education services worldwide.The reduction in education spending adversely affects every student and teacher; it threatens to undermine the education of future generations,     exacerbate social inequalities and reverse many of the hard-earned economic and social developments of recent decades.On 18-19 October, EI is hosting a Seminar in Brussels with the theme “Education in Crisis” to address these issues. Seminar participants will include representatives of EI member organisations as well as invited speakers and guests from around the world.On 18 October, discussions and presentations will focus on exiting the economic crisis through economic policies that address stability and growth and the future funding of public education systems. On 19 October, participants will examine the devastating impacts that the economic recession has had on education systems worldwide, especially in developing countries, and consider responses which would repair those effects.Keynote addresses will be given by both Professor Deborah Meier of the Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, U.S. and by Carol Bellamy, the Chair of the Global Partnership for Education, U.S.This Seminar will take place at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Place Rogier in Brussels, Belgium. Please download the full agenda following this link.Take part in the discussions on Twitter! The seminar’s hashtag is #educationincrisisSource: Education International
  • Conference to speed up progress towards Education for All in AfricaRepresentatives from the 47 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, regional coordination mechanisms and development partners will meet in Johannesburg, South Africa from 16-19 October 2012.They will decide together on the ways and means to speed up progress towards the Education for All 2015 goals. They will also discuss the post-15 agenda for education in Africa.The conference is organized by the EFA Convenors (UNDP, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNICEF and the World Bank) in collaboration with the other development partners including the African Development Bank, ADEA, ILO, FAWE and ANCEFA.The Johannesburg meeting aims at:Reviewing the EFA coordination mechanisms in sub-Saharan Africa and proposing new means to reinforce them;
    Contributing to the report on Education For All in Africa;
    Preparing an action plan to speed up progress towards the EFA 2015 objectives (taking into consideration the UN Secretary-General’s new initiative on education, Education First;
    Making recommendations for the post-2015 agenda for education in AfricaIdentifying Africa’s concernUNESCO’s Regional Office in Dakar is publishing a series of country profiles to assess how far African countries have progressed towards the six Education for All goals by 2015.Remarkable efforts have been made in sub-Saharan Africa since 2000 and significant progress has been accomplished. However, as several reports point out, including the Education for All country profiles prepared by UNESCO, it is a serious challenge for most countries in the region to achieve the EFA goals by 2015.The meeting will identify specific priorities and concerns in Africa that will feed into the EFA global coordination meeting to be held in November 2012 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.Significant improvements needed“A wide-ranging improvement in education is a prerequisite to reach a level of sustainable growth that is high enough to reduce poverty and help establishing more integrative, democratic and equitable societies,” says Ann Therese Ndong-Jatta, Director of UNESCO’s Regional Office in Dakar.She adds that we all (countries, the African Union, regional economic communities, UN agencies, government organisations, NGOs, base communities, the private sector etc.) have to increase our efforts in Africa and speed up progress for the countries to come as close as possible to the EFA goals, if not achieving them.Launch of EFA Global Monitoring Report 2012The EFA regional coordination meeting for sub-Saharan Africa will begin with the launch of the EFA Global Monitoring Report 2012 which this year focuses on Youth and Skills: Putting education to work.The launch will take place in Soweto – where the needs for education among youth and adults are far from being satisfied.Source: UNESCO
  • Engaging youth in planning education for social transformationIIEP is organizing its annual policy forum from 16 to 18 October in Paris (France) that will focus on youth engagement in educational planning and policy-making processes. The event will create dialogue between young people, policy-makers, practitioners and researchers to promote meaningful youth engagement within different levels of formal and non-formal education and training sectors.
    Despite considerable progress, many countries are not on target to meet the six Education for All goals by 2015. Education and training systems in many countries are failing in their mandate to provide quality education that is both universally accessible and relevant to youth in their new and changing environments. Consequently, many young people have become disenfranchized with their education systems.
    Youth are far from defeated however, as many of them have become informal yet active participants in the creative learning and educational planning process. There is also growing recognition amongst global and national institutions that young people are key partners in ensuring continued progress.
    With this growing awareness in mind, IIEP is organizing a policy forum from 16 to 18 October in Paris (France) that will focus on youth engagement in educational planning and policy-making processes. The event will create dialogue between young people, policy-makers, practitioners and researchers to promote meaningful youth engagement within different levels of formal and non-formal education and training sectors.
    The opening of the forum is set to coincide with the launch of the 2012 UNESCO Global Monitoring Report (GMR) on Youth, Work and Skills, and will include presentations from UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador, Forest Whitaker and winner of the International Children’s Peace Prize 2011, Chaeli Mycroft, panel discussions amongst youth, researchers and policy-makers, and an interactive web platform to promote follow-up discussions between youth and key stakeholders from around the world. The event will explore three key themes:
    1. Youth engagement in planning education for conflict transformation and peace building.
    2. Strengthening young peoples’ skills and opportunities for civic engagement within formal and non-formal education systems.
    3. Enhancing the relevance of education systems for young people in their transition into employment.
    Partner organizations of the project include the World Assembly of Youth, two UNESCO Chairs, Laval University, the International Fund for Agricultural Development.Details
    Type of Event     Category 8-Symposium
    Start     16.10.2012 09:00 local time
    End     18.10.2012 17:00 local time
    Focal point     Bird, Lyndsay
    Country     France
    City     Paris
    Venue     UNESCO Headquarters
    Street     7 Place de Fontenoy
    Room     Room II
    Language of Event     English, FrenchMore information: http://www.planwithyouth.org/home/
  • Post 2015 updates / e-discussion on Gender /

    Post 2015 Updates:

    1.      Civil Society Dialogue with HLP on Post 2015 Development Agenda
    2.      Inequalities Advisory Group
    3.      e-Discussion online on Inequalities/Gender Equality
    4.      Mobilization Task Force
    5.      The WorldWeWant2015.org web portal
    6.      High Level Panel Meeting in London
    7.    Other resourcesDear colleagues,This notice has many updates. The information on Post 2015 is coming at a fast and furious pace, and at the same time people are saying there is no information or not enough. It seems much of the information is concentrated in certain spaces and confined places. Many of you thank us for providing these updates. We will continue to send updates and information particularly around the Post-2015 process via our listserves as well as on our website/2015 webblog. We hope to not only provide the basic information but background, strategic and other info scoops.
    The opening of the general debate of the General Assembly last week at the UN was its usual fanfare: high security, round the clock events, networking opportunities galore, with every other word and utterance spoken being “2015 or post something or other”, and unfortunately offering little or no time to discern and reflect.  Here are some reflections and sharing of information:1. The Civil Society Dialogue with UN Representatives and the S-G’s High Level Panel (HLP) of Eminent Persons on the Post 2015 Development Agenda a week ago Monday brought about 180+ persons to meet and hear from key UN representatives in charge of various processes and entry points for the Post 2015 process. Featured also were members of the S-G’s HLP for the Post 2015 Development Agenda. Friday before the event the number of panelists was confirmed at five. Before the weekend was over it had increased by one to six. An hour before the start of the session was confirmed that seven panelists would participate. In the end nine participated, these include: H.M. Queen Rania Al Abdullah (Jordan), Tawakel Karman (Yemen), John Podesta (US), Gunilla Carlsson (Sweden), Fulbert Gero Amoussouga (Benin), Horst Kohler (Germany), Jean-Michel Severino (France), Betty Maina (Kenya) and Emilia Pires (Timor-Leste). Each panelist was allotted time for brief welcoming remarks which turned into more lengthy introductory remarks by most. For a summary, please see the UN-NGLS Round Up.  For bios of the HLP, see HLP bios. For information of Post 2015 Process and engagement entry points, see 3 Pillars handout distributed by UN-NGLS at the CS Dialogue.
    The Dialogue also included two civil society discussants (Bernadette Fischler of Beyond 2015 and Paul Okumu of African CSO Coalition on Principles & Partnerships) and myself as moderator. With the Panelists arriving late, the session started half an hour behind schedule cutting into the Q & A part however the diversity of civil society was reflected in the interventions from the floor which included workers (ITUC/Sara Burke/FES); socially excluded and impoverished communities (Paul Divakar/Dalit human rights); inclusion of international financial structure analysis for Post 2015 (Bhumika Muchhala-Third World Network); disabilities rights; rural/grassroots women (Fatima Ahmed, Sudan); women’s movement (Shannon Kowalski/IWHC and women’s coalition on 2015), environmentalist (Patricia Lerner, Greenpeace International), inclusion of youth and more women’s issues via twitter.
    The participation of four high level UN representatives, nine members of the High Level Panel, numerous aides of the HLP, including two staff members of the HLP co-chair and UK Prime Minister David Cameron, representatives of many UN agencies (NGLS, UNMC, UNDP, DESA, UNV, UN Women were co-supporters), as well as an engaged civil society present in the room and online indicated a high level of interest in civil society engagement with the HLP.  The CS Dialogue put in motion what we hope and what was mentioned in my introductory remarks is consistent, in depth and genuine dialogue with civil society and NGOs on the Post-2015 process as well as it setting a precedent to hold these civil society dialogues at the next gatherings of the HLP.
    The CS Dialogue provided an initial “meet and greet” directly with the HLP even before the HLP had met officially for the first time (they met the next day on Sept. 25th). Nevertheless, the fairly strong showing and the expressed solidarity with civil society by many members was an indication that HLP, at least those present, view civil society as partners in the dialogue around Post 2015. Some mentioned how the development agenda and narrative needed to shift dramatically and called for a more “robust approach.” Strong supportive statements came from Queen Rania, Gunilla Carlsson, Emilia Pirez (comes from civil society) and Yemeni activist Tawakel Karman who said, “I will be your voice” on the HLP.
    It also provided the opportunity to meet the key persons in the Post-2015 Development Agenda:Amina J. Mohammed, Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Post-2015 Development Planning – Amina is the key person from the S-G’s office  who will orchestrate much of the planning and strategizing involved in the Post 2015 process. She has already met with members of the UN NGO Post-2015 Working Group a month ago and was a strong voice for civil society participation.  She stressed that the process will be open, inclusive and transparent. One definite promise made at the Dialogue was to respond to a critique of the HLP Terms of Reference by certain members of civil society (see Beyond 2015/GCAP with support from ITUC and CIVICUS. The FTF together with GCAP pushed to include some gender analysis into this critique with some push back on the inclusion of language).
    Amina also introduce Nelson Muffuh, (formerly with UNMC Africa) the new Multistakeholder Outreach Coordinator in Amina’s office and a key liaison for civil society.
    John Hendra, Co-chair of UNDG, and Assistant Secretary General (ASG) of UN Women, emphasized among other points the country and thematic consultations which fall under his purvey. He emphasized the civil society/UN web platform http://www.worldwewant2015.org (see more info below) as a means for substantive inputs and sharing of information. UN Women together with UNICEF are conveners of the Inequalities Consultation.
    Shamshad Akhtar, ASG DESA, is a key person for the sustainable development goals (SDG) agenda and the Intergovernmental Open Working Group on SDG (part of Rio+20 follow-up)Homi Kharas, Lead Author and Executive Secretary of the Secretariat of the HLP, will be the collector of information from the HLP members to author a report of their recommendations. The HLP staff, including an Outreach Coordinator for stakeholders, is still being put together. Requests have been made to key civil society representatives for the position of outreach coordinator but they have been turned down so the search continues.
    The next meeting of the HLP is in London on November 1-2. Initial plans included a first informal day with a civil society dialogue and a closed door session the next day with the HLP. The first meeting was originally planned for Monrovia, Liberia but was changed after the HLP met on 9-25. Information from the meeting indicated that David Cameron took charge of the meeting. We hear that inputs into the report should be made before December 31 to ensure they will be in the first draft of the report. This means civil society input at the next meeting is key.2.  Inequalities Advisory Group– As reported in earlier updates, the FTF is a member on the Inequalities Advisory Group. UNICEF and UN Women are co-convening the Advisory Group for the Inequalities Consultation, comprised of key representatives of civil society, UN and academic institutions. NGO partners on the Advisory Group include DAWN, FEMNET, Beyond 2015 (represented by Bahai), and South Centre. The Advisory Group is  part of the UN System’s contribution to the development of the post-2015 agenda. The UN Development Group (UNDG) — as chaired by UNDP — is leading the planning efforts to catalyze a “global conversation” on post-2015 through a series of at least 50 national consultations and nine global thematic consultations.  The aim of these consultations is to bring together a broad range of stakeholders (including civil society, academics, government officials, etc.) to review progress on the MDGs and to discuss the options for a new framework beyond 2015. Click here for more information on the advisory group.3. e-Discussion online on Inequalities/Gender Equality
    As part of our participation on the Addressing Inequalities Consultation Advisory Group, we are participating in the e-discussion which begins Oct. 3rd and lasts until Oct.24th. This is the first online consultation with other thematic consultations sure to follow the model.  I have been asked to co-moderate part of the e-discussion and have been advising on how to be more inclusive, more strategic and provide more outreach to “marginalized” groups. UN Women and UNICEF place much importance in the global conversation on inequalities.  See invite here.
    For those around the world it is the opportunity to include diversity of voices not only from NGOs but from academics, those involved in media, grassroots groups and activists. Also important is to have gender inputs related to ‘inequalities’ and touching on the other thematic consultations (listed below) and from key constituencies (VAW, LBGT, grassroots, indigenous, disabilities, socially-excluded, youth and children) in order to ensure gender is cross-cutting and that inputs build on what has been provided in the main consultation relating to gender. Building our messaging and constituency regarding the other consultations will mean we have a leg up when the other online consultations take place.
    •        Population;
    •        Health;
    •        Education;
    •        Growth & Employment;
    •        Conflict & Fragility;
    •        Governance;
    •        Environmental Sustainability;
    •        Food Security and Nutrition
    •        Water and Sanitation (added recently, UNICEF & UN DESA convened)
    •        Energy (added recently-UNIDO convened)Co-moderators include:
    Nicole Bidegain from Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN); Kate McInturff from Amnesty International (Canadian Section), Rosa Lizarde from Feminist Task Force and Ranja Sengupta from the Third World Network (TWN). I will begin co-moderating on October 17th, International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.
    The recommendations emerging from your contributions will be part of a synthesis report that will be presented at a high-level meeting in Denmark in February 2013 on inequalities as well as transmitted to the HLP. For more information on how you can join the discussion go to www.worldwewant2015.org or  Gender Equality discussion  It is important to highlight RECOMMENDATIONS in your interventions.
    From UN Women and UNICEF:  We are delighted to welcome you to the global conversation on gender equality; the first of a series of e-discussions taking place as part of the Global Thematic Consultation on Addressing Inequalities.  The discussion on gender equality will run for three weeks from the 3-24 October 2012.Key questions to consider:
    1.      What are the most widespread and fundamental forms of gender-based inequalities faced by women and girls? (Contributors may wish to cite examples, including discussion of where and among whom these challenges occur, their severity, the evidence about them, etc.)
    2.      What are the major structural factors at the root of these inequalities, within and among different societies?
    3.      What kinds of policies, strategies or interventions have been most successful in addressing the various inequalities experienced by women and girls? And under which conditions/in which situations have particular policies, strategies or interventions had the greatest, lasting impact? (Contributors may wish to cite examples or give references to these “successes”).
    4.      Based on experience, what are the most important Recommendations that could be proposed in the Post-2015 Development Agenda for making a lasting and transformative impact on the different forms of inequalities faced by women and girls on the basis of gender?
    5.      What actions and initiatives could be taken by different stakeholders, including civil society, to bring about lasting improvements in these inequalities? How can we ensure the implementation phase of the new Development Framework will be more inclusive of those who face inequalities, and more accountable to them?
    To participate, it is not necessary to register, but you are welcomed and encouraged to log-in here. This site is available in English, French and Spanish, and you are invited to post your contribution in any of the sixty languages supported by the site’s Google translate feature.4. Mobilization Task Force– The next call for the Mobilization Task Force on the Post 2015 Development Agenda is on Friday, October 12 at 9am EST/NY – 1 GMT. Call in details and agenda will be circulated.5. The WorldWeWant2015.org web platform
    The UN Development Group (UNDG), in collaboration with the UN Millennium Campaign (UNMC) and civil society, has developed a platform for stimulating multi-stakeholder online engagement around the post-2015 agenda.  This platform was launched to coincide with the Civil Society Dialogue with the HLP and key UN representatives held Sept. 24th. Previously, there was a landing page established at the URL: www.worldwewant2015.org  This web platform is a partnership between the UN and civil society, with members of civil society contributing to the content on the site. Notably GCAP with input from CIVICUS have contributed to the development and launching of the web platform. We are soliciting more engagement and input from civil society to ensure content development which reflects our constituencies, in particular women, our views and perspectives.  A call was made at the last Mobilization Task Force teleconference call requesting experienced people in digital communications and I emailed representatives at some women’s organizations before the Sept. 24th launch deadline. Thanks to those that responded.  If you are interested, please contact web coordinator Zach Hongola at zach.hongola_at_whiteband.org
    UNICEF and UN Women are using this platform for the online discussions and consultations with different groups and constituencies leading up to the actual Inequalities meeting/conference.6. High Level Panel Meeting in London
    The next meeting of the HLP is in London on November 1-2. Initial plans included a first informal day with a civil society dialogue and a closed door session the next day with the HLP. The first meeting was originally planned for Monrovia, Liberia but was changed after the HLP met on 9-25. Information from the first meeting of the HLP on September 25th indicated that David Cameron took charge of the meeting resulting in the change of venue for the first meeting. We hear that inputs into the report should be made before December 31 to ensure they will be in the first draft of the report. This means civil society input is crucial at the next meeting of the HLP in London.
    The UK government representatives have requested input about the CS Dialogue for the London meeting and have been open to suggestions.  The FTF has called for gender balance in the representation of civil society at the CS Dialogue as well as equal representation from the Global South and North. We are soliciting information from partners who have colleagues in London who might be able to attend. For those interested in strategizing on the London meeting, please contact me at Rosaencasa_at_aol.com
    HLP meetings:
    Second meeting – London, 1-2 Nov. 2012
    Third meeting – Liberia: January, 2013
    Fourth meeting – Indonesia: March, 2013
    Fifth meeting – New York: May, 20137.   Other resourcesRealizing the Future We Want for All: Report to the Secretary General from the UN System Task Team
    http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/policy/untaskteam_undf/untt_report.pdf
    Intergovernmental processes of relevance for post-2015 UN development agenda preparations
    http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/policy/untaskteam_undf/post2015_rel_intergov_processes.pdf
    Thematic and National Consultations   http://www.worldwewant2015.org/sitemap
    High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda  and TOR
    Post 2015 Process and engagement entry points – 3 Pillars handout distributed by UN-NGLS at the CS Dialogue.
    We realize this is a lot of information to digest. We will follow-up separately with specific information on the various issues in case you miss reading it all as well as post on our website/Post 2015 blog to serve as a back-up reference.BestRosa G. Lizarde
    Global Coordinator
    Feminist Task Force-GCAP
  • Gender Equality – Discussion starts Wednesday 3 October

    We are thrilled to welcome you to the global conversation on gender equality; the first of a series of e-discussions taking place as part of the Global Thematic Consultation on Addressing Inequalities in the Post-2015 Development Agenda. The discussion on gender equality will run for three weeks from the 3-24 October 2012.

    Throughout the discussion we will be joined by guest moderators who will respond to your questions and contributions, and guide and summarize the discussion. We are delighted to introduce the first of these guest moderators: Nicole Bidegain from Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN); Rosa G. Lizarde from the Feminist Task Force, Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP); Kate McInturff from Amnesty International (Canadian Section), and Ranja Sengupta from the Third World Network (TWN).

    We hope this platform is an opportunity for a multitude of voices to be heard from civil society, academia, media, national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the private sector, governments, the UN System, and most importantly, the general public. We invite you all to join us in envisioning a world free from inequalities and gender-based discrimination.

    The recommendations emerging from your contributions will be part of a synthesis report that will be presented to a high-level meeting in Denmark in February 2013 on inequalities. The report will also be transmitted to the High-level Panel appointed by the Secretary-General.

    The aim of the consultation is to be as broad and open as possible, you are strongly encouraged to share not only your views, but also engage with and bring forth the voices of the constituencies you represent.

    To kick off the global conversation on gender equality we invite you to reflect on the following set of questions:

    What are the most widespread and fundamental forms of gender-based inequalities faced by women and girls? (Contributors may wish to cite examples, including discussion of where and among whom these challenges occur, their severity, the evidence about them, etc.)
    What are the major structural factors at the root of these inequalities, within and among different societies?
    What kinds of policies, strategies or interventions have been most successful in addressing the various inequalities experienced by women and girls? And under which conditions/in which situations have particular policies, strategies or interventions had the greatest, lasting impact? (Contributors may wish to cite examples or give references to these “successes”).
    Based on experience, what are the most important Recommendations that could be proposed in the Post-2015 Development Agenda for making a lasting and transformative impact on the different forms of inequalities faced by women and girls on the basis of gender?
    What actions and initiatives could be taken by different stakeholders, including civil society, to bring about lasting improvements in these inequalities? How can we ensure the implementation phase of the new Development Framework will be more inclusive of those who face inequalities, and more accountable to them?

    This discussion will take place on the Addressing Inequalities consultation site: www.worldwewant2015.org/inequalities. To participate, please visit the site and post your response in the discussion forum.  It is not necessary to register, but you are welcomed to do so. The site is available in English, French and Spanish. In addition, you are invited to post your contribution in any of the sixty languages supported by the site’s Google translate feature.

    Without further ado, the space is yours. We look forward to hearing from you on how to work for a better world!

    Venue: Online at: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/inequalities

     

  • Civil society calls on Post-2015 High Level Panel to not miss the opportunity to make a lasting difference for the poorest and most excluded

24 September 2012

New York, 24 September 2012: On the sidelines of the opening of the UN General Assembly (UNGA), civil society turned out in large numbers to dialogue with members of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda and its Secretariat.

The dialogue was organized by civil society, led by CIVICUS World Alliance for Citizen Participation, the Global Call to Action against Poverty (GCAP), Beyond2015, and Stakeholder Forum and supported by the UN Millennium Campaign, UN Non-Governmental Liaison Service, UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, UN Development Programme, UN Women, and UN Volunteers.

The event was ably chaired by Rosa Lizarde, Global Coordinator of the Feminist Task Force of GCAP. High-Level Panel members in attendance included Amina J. Mohammed, Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Post-2015 Development Planning, Queen Rania of Jordan, Tawakel Karman, John Podesta, Gunilla Carlsson, Fulbert Gero Amoussouga, Horst Kohler, Jean-Michel Severino, Betty Maina, and Emilia Pires. (For more information, including biographical data, on the Panel please click here.)

Ms. Mohammed, offering introductory remarks, noted that significant unfinished business remains in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and that legitimacy for the Post 2015 agenda would be derived from successfully achieving the MDGs. She expressed the hope that it will not take long before Member States and citizens own the new goals, as it did for the MDGs, but that they will hit the ground running in 2015. She also emphasized her expectation that the process of creating the new agenda will be open, inclusive and transparent.

Queen Rania stated that “Civil society are the heart of development….only when we work together across organizations and institutions can we achieve real impact.” Other panel members emphasized, inter alia, the importance of this discussion with civil society before the first meeting of the High-Level Panel, the role of civil society’s voice in its work, and the challenge of creating meaningful jobs.

Two members of civil society then offered comments. Bernadette Fischler of Beyond2015 reported on the declaration developed at the CIVICUS World Assembly, which convened in Montreal in early September, and emphasized the need to eradicate poverty, reverse growing inequality and achieve environmental sustainability. She looked forward to learning the Panel’s thoughts on these priorities, and expressed disappointment that there was no mention of human rights in the Panel’s terms of reference. She also called attention to a new initiative, Participate, which was launched by Beyond2015 and IDS on 25 September.

Paul Okumu, Saferworld/African CSO Coalition on Principles & Partnerships, emphasized the narrative, process and outcome, stressing the issues of accountability, transparency and human rights. His message to the panel: “Rarely do people have the opportunity to change the world; you do, the world is in your hands…don’t miss this opportunity.”

Additional comments from civil society participants included: inquiries about why no member of a worker’s organization was on the panel and how to engage youth in the post-2015 development agenda; the importance of a rights-based approach and of galvanizing political will; and the need to include the international financial structure in the Panel’s focus, to develop targets for a social protection floor and for gender equality and women’s empowerment.

John Hendra (Co-chair of UNDG, UN Women) agreed on the importance of inclusiveness, human rights, and accountability. He noted the upcoming country and thematic consultations, as well as the web platform http://www.worldwewant2015.org, which is meant to inform the global consultation. Shamshad Akhtar (Assistant Secretary General, Department of Economic and Social Affairs) highlighted that the MDG and sustainable development goals agendas are interlinked. Homi Kharas (Lead Author and Executive Secretary of the Secretariat that will support the High-Level Panel) said the Panel will have meetings in other countries and hopes to have outreach opportunities, emphasizing the importance of transparency, accountability and anti-discrimination as bedrocks for development.

The livestream of this event is available on www.worldwewant2015.org. This web platform was also used to take questions from participants watching the webcast and from Twitter, where the conversation followed hashtag #Dialogue2015.

For further information contact: Kathryn Tobin, UN-NGLS: kathrynjtobin[AT]gmail.com Anand Kantaria, UN Millennium Campaign: anand.kantaria[AT]undp.org

Source: http://www.un-ngls.org/spip.php?article4102

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